absolutely nothing to do with BK – Deep Blues Festival

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  • #90108
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    cjohnson22463 – 1 day ago  » 

    we're starting to do daily announcements of performers for the 2012 Bayport BBQ Deep Blues Festival. so far:

    #1 David Kimbrough Jr

    #2 Henry's Funeral Shoe

    daily announcements, news and links are on the fest

    facebook page

    #3 Possessed By Paul James

    #4 Left Lane Cruiser

    24 more to go

    #90109
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    We're going to end up with 25 bands at this year's fest. Nine one hour sets each day. One headliner is going to play each night at 10pm to close out each day. We've got a real nice mix of styles and about 50/50 returning acts and new bands. Here's a new one I'm pretty excited about.

    #5 Charlie Patton's War

    Here's what my friend Rick Saunders had to say about this band

    realdeepblues blog

    #90110
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #6 Ben Prestage

    Ben Prestage’s musical background began before he was born… even before his parents were born. Ben’s great-grandmother was a Vaudeville musican who toured with Al Jolson and also participated in medicine shows. Her daughter was a Boogie-Woogie pianist and painter who used to play for Ben when he was coming up. On the other side of the family tree, his grandfather, who was a Mississippi sharecropper turned Ben onto the sounds and culture of Mississippi and Blues in general. “When my father was growing up in Mississippi,” states Ben, “ they never had running water and the only electricity was one light bulb that hung from the ceiling, but they had it better than some of their neighbors, because they didn’t have dirt floors. I grew up in rural Florida, on a 14-mile-long dirt road, near the headwaters of the Everglades. It was 7 miles either direction to the nearest paved road, and when you got to pavement, you still weren't near a town. It was panther, gator, and cottonmouth country. Out there, there was only one kind of music in the house. Whether it was being played on an instrument, or on a recording, it was Blues.

    “One day though, in my early teens, I went to help a neighbor build a chicken-coop on his property. When we went inside to eat lunch, I asked him about a banjo I saw in the corner. He picked it up and I heard Bluegrass music for the first time. He was from a musical family and learned old-time banjo from his father from the South Ohio/North Kentucky hills. He lived half a mile away, but it was so quiet out there, you could hear that banjo all the way to my house, if he was on his porch and I was on mine.. He made homemede wine with my dad and when he’d come over, he’d bring his banjo and show me how to pick with my fingers instead of a plectrum.”

    Later while living in Memphis, Prestage became a busker (street performer) on historic Beale Street. This is where he perfected his drum-kit. "I played out there a few times with nothing but a guitar and my voice. Once people heard me they liked it, but it was hard to get them on my side of the street with all the other music going on down there. There were some other guys out there who played drums with their feet, and they always got people's attention. I started playing drums with my feet as an attention grabber but soon found out that the drums played with foot pedals actually enhaced my music dramatically. Not only were people listening and buyin' discs, they were now dancing and hollerin' to boot. Now I am to the point where, if you close your eyes, you would think there was a professional drummer with a full-size drumkit behind me. I learned alot from the guys I shared the street with, including John Lowe, (inventor of the Lowebow, a type of diddley-bow that I play), Robert Belfour, and Richard Johnston."

    Ben returned to Memphis over the next few years for the International Blues Challenge (the world's largest gathering of Blues musicians) and within three consecutive years took he 4th, 3rd, and 2nd place. He is also the only two-time recipient of the Lyon/Pitchford Award for "Best Diddley-Bow Player." Ben's interesting approach to instrumentation, (fingerstyle guitar, harmonica, banjo, lap-steel, fiddle, resonator guitar, foot-drums, vocals, and his award-winning original songwriting (recipient of "The Most Unique Performer" at "The Song- writers' Showcase of America") has earned him invitations to perform across North America, Europe, and as far as North Africa. All awards aside, he has proven himself, through his live performances, to be the future of American Blues, Roots Music, Americana and is one of today’s most talented outsider artist.

    #90111
    Mr.ssippi
    Mr.ssippi
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    Ben Prestage is amazing.. Thanks for posting this!

    #90112
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #7 restavrant

    "Restavrant are two screemin freeks—term used so respectfully—from adorable Victoria, Texas, that use expired license plates for drum parts and bodily drag truly addled hillbillyism into the digital age. They engineer a sloppy collision between Hasil Adkins and DJ Assault that boils down to beat, guitar and rooster-at-sunrise screaming, and behind them the drunkest dancers fall obediently in line."

    -The Echo

    http://www.reverbnation.com/restavrant

    #90113

    hudsonsaul
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    Is there an all encompassing site where I can read about this festival your putting on? (I'm not on facebook). Or do you mind me firing off some Qs to you?

    Been wanting to go to one of the Deep Blues Festivals for a while now, and hoping this is the year to travel half way round the world for it. All the better with the likes of LLC and Charlie Pattons War in the lineup.

    #90114
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    Thanks for your interest! We've had many foreign fans and bands attend the fests.

    One of the supporters of the events has volunteered with some web design. You can see her efforts here.

    http://bayportbbq.com/deepbluesfestival/category/press-media/

    There are many youtube videos connected to deep blues. Give it a search and you'll find quite a bit.

    #90115
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #8 Delaney Davidson

    We've had many foreign bands and fans at the previous fests. Delaney is from New Zealand. Here's his website and bio.

    http://www.delaneydavidson.com/

    Part man part wheel, Delaney Davidson is part wandering minstrel, part travelling salesman. One hand holds a small brown suitcase, his trade, his ghost orchestra, the other holds his guitar. One foot firmly in the Blues Trash corner of the ring, the other on the road, you could say Delaney sees music as he sees geography, and that although he has certain preferences, in fact all territories are up for grabs. Ireland, Germany, Italy, Brazil, UK, Switzerland, Mexico, Austria, Romania, Belgium, Holland, Russia, France, USA, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand, all destinations on the ten year Solo Tour with which Davidson has turned homelessness into a success of its own. Man of a thousand faces, his work with paint, music, film and concept all has traces of his unique take on life. Part new world and part old world, this duality is echoed in the flavours he evokes with his work; Past VS present, too loud for folk VS too quiet for rock, Light VS Dark, Davidsons restless work refuses to be still for the portrait it is asked to sit for. A pattern we see in his own restless life, indeed, the apple never falls far from the tree.

    “One rotten apple ruins the whole barrel” laughs Delaney when asked to describe his work. “But then I think we all need a few rotten apples, and sometimes thats where the flavour comes from, ripe vs rotten, where does one cross over into the other”

    This approach of DIY has a special flavour of its own, and can continually be seen in Davidsons work. “Neccessity is the mother of invention, and a lo budget will lead to all sorts of beautiful stand-in potential. Whistling instead of violins. I love to see things take a step, and I think people like to see the triumph of a good idea over a slick production, I think it gives them hope and inspiration. Ultimately the result of hi gloss is alienation and a removed and depressed let down feeling or not being good enough. I say let it all go!”

    While Davidson seeks to embody this ethic he also displays a degree of skill in his work. His painting exhibitions of Nocturnal Landscape in the early 1990′s showed a minimal use of form bordering on abstract and a tonal blend of colours that were darker than black. What these works lacked in skill they made up for in concept; they delighted the man on the street and astounded the connisseur. While he has spread the word of both New Zealand aswell as Voodoo Rhythm all through the world, there has also been talk of his being awarded an Honorary Masters degree in recognition of the body of work that has appeared over the years from his hand.

    He proves this true in the series of short video films he is continually releasing on Youtube. All made on little or no budget, each one a triumph of style and medium. Lending itself well to visuals, the personality of his musical work has been sought after for film soundtrack, see the “Flammend Herz” (story of Herbert Hoffman, Hamburg Reeperbahns oldest tatooist), aswell as “Netherwood ” a localised tale of rural darkness, and the Delaney scowl is immortalised by Slowboat Films as his portrayal of Parrish echoes across the screen in the soporiphic noircotic nightmare “The Road to Nod” ; the tale of an old Jailbird as he spirals to hell.

    His doorkeeper stance on stage work has often been one of pioneer, as was shown in his introduction of the lap steel into the Basel Stadt-theatres production of Die Dreigroschen Oper. Again walking the lines between, Delaney’s master of ceremonies attack was a key ingredient in the success of “Random Acts of God” a Contemporary Dance show as response to Christchurchs Earthquakes by Corrupt Productions.

    Wisconsins Steelbridge Songfestival (Brain child of Timbuk3′s Pat Macdonald), aswell as Port Lyttletons Harbour Union both showcased his dark sense of humour and his ability to write with others, as does his melodic work in the Dead Brothers, but he seems to come into his own when he is solo. “I think its hard enough to follow your own path or brain and find the time or space to hear it. The idea of asking anyone else to follow it seems like a huge task for all involved. If you only have one suitcase, you can move house in a half hour. On the other hand if you have your house tidied up you can invite people round to dinner, and I love to work with others on certain things to acheive a flavour I can’t capture alone”

    However nothing embodies his spirit of floating work as ramblingly succinctly as the eternal tour he began in the beginning of the century and still continues today. Work that encompasses some ten years and several continents, countless shows and numerous releases. He has shared the bills with Underground Queen Holly Golightly, Cult legend Reverend Beatman, Radical Film-maker Miron Zownir, German Intellectual Franz Dobler, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Jack Oblivian, Bob Log III , Dr Quintron and T model Ford. Has it become a way of life for him? “I never worked so hard as I do now, Self Emplyoment is the key to an early grave, I see this in lots of musician friends of mine aswell. you are your own travel agent, your own booking agent, your own photographer, your own graphic designer, your own manager, your own producer.. on top of that you are a musician. With my show I am the drummer, singer, guitarist and sometimes harmonica player, you could say it is not a way of life, it IS life”

    #90116
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #9 Tijauna Hercules!

    http://tijuanahercules.com/

    History-wise, from what I can gather, singer/guitarist John Forbes is no stranger to the whole scuzz-skronk thing, the hellhound on his trail for nearly 20 years through bands like Phantom 309, Dirt, and Mount Shasta. While I can't pretend to any knowledge regarding any of those line items on his resume, one thing's for sure – Tijuana Hercules' debut album is one of those rare, loose-bolted contraptions designed to be played twice a night and once before breakfast, Forbes' voice possessed of magnificent, sometimes scary intensity. Somewhere Howlin' Wolf is turning in his grave like a gas station rotisserie hot dog.

    At least the Wolf won't have to look very far to find Forbes and his running buddies in Tijuana Hercules – Zak Piper (tin cans, tambourines, cowbell, shakers, trumpet, and trombone) and Chad Smith (drums) – since the trio claim Chicago addresses on their census forms. Their take on the blues is full, beer bellied, and gritty, Forbes dipping his boots in Captain Beefheart and Country Dick Montana territory with a vocal delivery that sounds as if it's fuelled by a tumbler of poison.

    As a guitarist, Forbes seems to draw inspiration from Elmore James, Hound Dog Taylor, and Chuck Berry, playing with dogged enthusiasm and robust fervor and, along with the kitchen drawerful of instruments at Piper's disposal, makes "Tijuana Hercules" pulse with backwoods charm. "So Ripped," "Pack It In, Mama!" and "Whales On Every Side" are slicing, grinding party shuffles rife with barrelhouse rhythms and Forbes' primal, sub-glottal grunting and howling.

    On several tracks, Piper blows trumpet and trombone like a meth-sniffing bipolar teen who's lost his "What Would Jesus Do?" bracelet and while Tijuana Hercules come off all folksy – the CD booklet and rear insert festooned with Forbes' seriously deranged artwork – these guys sound as though their hearts pump pure arsenic, mad, bad, and dangerous to know.

    – Clark Paull (sleepin' with the tv on)

    #90117
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #10 John the Conqueror

    http://www.reverbnation.com/johntheconqueror

    When a Mississippi blues man walks into a big city bar and has a drink, starts on a downward spiral of sex and drugs to the soundtrack of Nirvana, Black Keys and Queens of the Stone Age, John the Conqueror is born. Effortlessly fusing early blues lyrical styles, pentatonic mastery and the riff heavy sensibility of the early 70's, John the Conqueror is an old soul in a new world while being a fresh breath in a room of stagnant air. Singer/guitarist Pierre Moore and drummer Michael Gardner have been playing the blues together since their early days in the backwoods of Mississippi. After a few years in Atlanta, they managed to find their way to Philadelphia, met up with bassist Ryan Lynn and took their roots and rocked them. Since their emergence on the Philadelphia scene earlier this year, they've managed to rack up an impressive number of shows, record two free EP's (the most recent released in late August 2011), and share their own unique take on the blues by combining it with their relished rock genres.

    #90118
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #11 Daniel Kroha

    Motor City Rocks blog

    Written by Kim Hill. Posted in Detroit Concerts June 2009

    This coming Saturday night, The Gories will be reuniting for the first time in over a decade. The show at the Majestic Theater in Detroit will be one of only three in the United States before they make a trip to Europe. Danny Kroha plays guitar along side Mick Collins with Peggy O’Neill on the drums. Aside from The Gories, Danny has also played in The Demolition Dollrods, The Readies, The Skies Above, and has recently performed with Rodriguez. All of his music has had a strong blues undercurrent; the impact of blues music can be heard heavily in The Gories, as well as his solo performances.

    Danny, can you talk a little bit about how you got started playing guitar?

    Well I always wanted to play guitar. When I was six I wanted an electric guitar really badly but my parents would have none of that. So it wasn’t until the age of 19, 18 or 19, I bought my first electric guitar and started teaching myself how to play. But before that I was the lead singer in a band. I was in this band called The Onset.

    So after that did you go away to college?

    Well I went away to college after high school, and my dad wanted me to go into business but I had no interest in business, I was just doing it because that was what he wanted me to do. And I didn’t . . . I don’t know, I wish I would have just been stronger about saying what I wanted but he . . . there really was no room for me to say what I wanted. It was kind of like, “You’re doing this and that’s all there is to it”. So my way of rebelling was to just, rather than yelling or something I just pretended like I was going to do what he wanted me to do but then ended up doing my own thing.

    He owns . . . He owned, he doesn’t anymore, he’s retired. He owned a factory that made breather elements and packaged various things. Emission hoses and gas filters and that sort of thing, and I worked there for a while just in the factory, just packaging stuff. It was during that time that I really started playing.

    When did The Gories first start playing?

    The Gories started in the very beginning of 1986.

    So that was right after The Onset was done?

    Yeah.

    Was the idea always to have the minimalist sound?

    Yeah absolutely. I think, none of us could really play that well at that point so we knew that we had to do something that was very simple. So we chose sort of a, you know, an instrumentation that would be simple and easy to do. We, at first, we were going to have a bass. Mick and I were going to play bass depending on who wrote the song. Whoever wrote the song got to play guitar. But, you know we discovered pretty quickly, I think on our first practice, that the two of us together pretty much equaled one guitar player. You know, like we discovered that I could actually play chords on the guitar and Mick couldn’t really play chords but he could play leads, and I wasn’t much of a lead player. So we decided, why don’t we just do it like this where I’ll play rhythm and you do leads? And, like I said, we just about equaled one guitar player.

    And Peggy, I mean Peggy never played an instrument before at all. So we knew that her kit would have to be very simple. And I even said, when we first started out, I don’t want any cymbals. Cause I’ve been in bands with drums that just bashed cymbals constantly, so I’m like, I don’t want any cymbals! No cymbals. It’s going to be like this Bo Diddley jungle beat and not even have a kick drum. We’ll just have tom toms, that’s it. So that was the idea.

    What was it about the blues that attracted you to that type of music?

    Probably because I’m white. (laughs) You know, and it’s like a foreign thing to me so it’s always been intriguing. I like things that are mysterious, and that’s always been a mysterious thing to me, and I’ve always loved it. I remember listening to the radio when I was like, I don’t know, I must have been in high school, and somehow I came across a Gospel station and it just blew my mind. I think I was kind of, from them on, bitten by the blues bug so to speak.

    I think the thing that I loved about the blues stuff is that it’s just so raw, so simple, so visceral. It just speaks to your soul and to your gut. And blues music, when I first heard Muddy Waters it almost scared me. It felt like something I shouldn’t be listening to. And of course that made it that much more attractive.

    How did you first start discovering these blues musicians?

    Well, from Yardbirds records. I got into The Yardbirds because they would play ‘For Your Love’ on the radio back in the early 80’s and I really loved that song, I thought it was great. It sounded absolutely nothing like what was happening. It sounded nothing like REO Speedwagon or Journey. And when I heard stuff like The Kinks ‘You Really Got Me’ and (The Yardbirds) ‘For Your Love’ I was like, that’s my music, that’s the stuff that I like. So I started getting into The Yardbirds and I found a Yardbirds record and loved it, an album called Having a Rave-Up with The Yardbirds. I loved it, I listened to it a lot, and I loved the songs so much that I started looking at the credits, who wrote these songs. And I noticed none of the songwriter’s names were anybody in The Yardbirds. And I’m like, well who are these guys that are writing these songs? So then I started to discover it was actually Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley. That these were the guys that were writing all these great songs. So I’m like, shit I’ve got to find out who those guys are. So I started seeking that stuff out and buying records by those guys. And once I heard that stuff I was like, aww my God, this is the real stuff.

    Another band you were in, The Demolition Dollrods, if you look at a lot of the album artwork and the live performances it seemed like you put a lot of effort into the costume and the stage presence. Can you talk about where those ideas came from?

    Well I think a lot of the costume ideas were really Margret. It was her idea for me to be a girl in the band cause she wanted an all girl band but she wanted me to be in it. So she was like, will you be a girl in my band, and I said yeah sure. I’ve always been kind of like, I don’t know, in touch with my female side I guess you could say. So, that was not a big stretch for me to do that. And I love dressing up anyway so, I was down with the whole idea. Yeah all those costume ideas were hers. But then once I really started getting into it and we started having costumes made then I would design my own costumes. I would make a drawing of it and I would tell the guy that made them what I wanted. Cause I really do love clothes and costuming and that sort of thing.

    To move on to another one of your projects, The Readies had a show not too long ago but you had a break for a while. Are there any plans with that band?

    Yeah, we just recorded a couple songs that we want to put out on a single. I’m not exactly sure who is going to put it out yet. But I think they came out good and I’m excited for them to come out. And once I get back from this Gories tour at the end of July I’m looking forward to doing some Readies stuff in August and onward.

    More shows or recording, or both?

    Both.

    For a while you were doing a lot of solo shows, could you talk about your diddley bo?

    Yeah, I have a record that was put out, probably in the 60’s or 70’s it’s called Detroit Blues of the 1950’s. A lot of the songs on it are culled from JVB Records catalog which is a very small Detroit blues label that existed in the 1950’s. It was this guy by the name of Joe Von Battle who had a record store and in the back of the record store he had a recording studio, a very primitive recording studio. He would record a lot of Detroit blues musicians, and then he would put out the records himself on his own label. He would just sell them in his store so they were never really distributed outside of Detroit and subsequently the records are very rare. But they are really great, super raw blues stuff, and one of the guys he recorded was a guy by the name of One String Sam. He only played on the streets of Detroit, he was a street musician, and he played this one stringed instrument called a diddley bo. Well I bought this compilation of Detroit blues from the 1950’s and One String Sam is on it, in fact he did only one record for JVB. One side of his one record is on this blues album. So I was just always intrigued by it, I love the sound of it, and I thought it wouldn’t be so hard to make one. So I came up with a design in my head and built one and refined it from playing it. Then after I had built one I saw a picture of One String Sam in a book about the blues and it looked very much like the one that I’d made.

    I heard that in the movie It Might Get Loud with Jack White there is a scene where he uses one as well. You two have been friends for a long time, is that something that you showed him?

    He may have gotten the idea from me, I’ve been doing it for a few years and I did send him some recordings so yeah he probably did get it from me. (laughs)

    What is that, It Might Get Loud?

    It’s a movie with Jack sort of representing rock music in the late 90’s/2000’s, The Edge from U2 representing the 80’s, and Jimmy Page representing the 70’s. They all cover their own 1/3 of the movie talking about their guitar playing and influences.

    Was it released? Has it come out yet?

    It played at the Toronto Film Festival, I’m not sure if they found a distributor.

    Oh okay. Yeah ,he probably did get it from me. I’ve been doing it for a few years now so, it may have been me.

    Another thing that I noticed at one of your solo shows you had kind of a homemade acoustic that you were using, can you talk about that?

    Well that guitar was given to me. I was driving around, I like to just drive around Detroit and look at old houses and stuff. So I’m driving around one day and come across a sort of intriguing place. It was an abandoned house but there were some things set up in the yard. There was a desk with a broken computer. In the driveway was this thing that looked like a missile but it was made out of heating ducts, like aluminum heating ducts. I thought it looked interesting so I stopped my car and got out and I was looking around at this yard and this guy comes out of the house. I started talking to him and he picked up a broken remote control off his desk in the yard, and he told me that if he pushed a button on it that that missile in the driveway would fly to the White House. (laughs) I thought, this is interesting. So we’re talking and somehow we go to the subject of guitars, he may have asked me what I do. So he went in the house and he came out with this guitar that he made himself that looked like a square made out of 2×4’s that had a neck on it that he had just put strings on. It had like four strings on it and he had it tuned to an opened chord and started playing some sort of blues type stuff. Then he said, well hold on a minute I’ve got a box that you’re going to like, I’ve got a box for you! So he went in the house and came out with that guitar. It wasn’t painted blue, it was yellow and it had some sort of magic marker drawings on it, and I kind of wish I would have left it like it was. But I had some old Rustoleum paint and I really liked the color of it. I think it’s a color they don’t make anymore, that blue. So I painted it blue. My friend Johnny who was a scrapper, he would go around and collect scrap metal, and he had a license from the City of Detroit to collect scrap metal. Well he’s driving around and going through garbage and he found a pick-up in the garbage. He knew I played guitar so he gave it to me. So that’s where that came from. It was all found.

    So what are your favorite records right now?

    Right now, I’m really loving the Monroe Brothers. They’re a 1930’s, Bluebird Label recording. For some reason I’m on a big country and gospel kick right now. I love songs like Gospel Ship, “I’m going for a trip on that old gospel ship”. Stuff like ‘May the Circle be Unbroken’, all of the traditional gospel, I love that stuff. The Monroe Brothers do a lot of that stuff so I really love that.

    I saw Willie Nelson recently, it was the second time I’ve seen him and he just blew my mind. He was so good. The band is really stripped down, really simple, really tasteful. His guitar playing is amazingly great, he’s a great singer, he does a wonderful variety of songs. He sings a good amount of gospel stuff, which I love. So that was one of my favorite things I saw recently.

    What else have I been listening to? I’ve been on this big folk music, Jim Kweskin, really into him. This guy Dave Van Ronk. Stuff like . . . well I haven’t been listening to a whole lot of rock and roll stuff. I just had Charlie Patton on the other day, I’ve been rediscovering Charlie Patton. To me he is one of the most difficult, old time blues singers to get into. It’s really taken me a lot of time to get into him. I listen to it, then put it away, then go back to it. It’s been quite a process but I’m starting to really grasp that stuff.

    What makes it so tough for you to get into?

    His singing, he’s really raw. He has a really raw singing and playing style. Because the records are so rare, they are very scratchy so that makes it hard to listen to. Also, his voice, it’s really difficult to understand what he’s saying, I think he’s the most difficult to understand. So that makes it hard.

    Oh, and I was listening to Rodriguez a lot too because I was doing those shows with him and his stuff really blows me away. Both of those, his two records are so great. I was getting into his second album quite a bit, called Coming From Reality. Got the CD that was just reissued and the bonus tracks are so good on that.

    So are you wrapped up with him now?

    Yeah he’s off this summer touring Europe and he has various bands around different places and I have lots of other things to do so. I really, really enjoyed playing with him and wish I could do more but it’s just not to be right now.

    So all your shows are posted for The Gories/Oblivions schedule are up on Myspace, that’s the final schedule?

    Yeah it’s all up on The Gories myspace page.

    Guest blogger Kim Hill Jr. runs the interview web site The What Of Whom and the Little Room Record Company

    #90119
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    We're getting many requests from folks saying they absolutely have to buy dbf tickets. I understand. Capacity is limited to 200 this year, so you're right to feel a little anxious.

    To calm your nerves, we're offering a special presale and "golden ticket bonus". Send me an email with number of tickets you want. I'll send you details on how to pay and enter you into the GREAT GOLDEN TICKET drawing. One lucky fan that does the presale will win a pair of GOLDEN TICKETS.

    A GOLDEN TICKET will give the fan front row seats at both stages, a full VIP MUSICIAN all area access pass including green room access with band beverages, plus I'll ask for a signed cd from each band to give to the winner. Pretty special!

    Regular ticket sales along with the full details and lineup will be April 5th.

    #90120
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
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    #12 Adam Gussow

    As a blues harmonica player and teacher, Adam Gussow has few peers in the business. Currently an Associate Professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi with a specialty in blues literature and culture.

    Gussow is best known for his long partnership with Mississippi-born guitarist and one-man-band Sterling "Mr. Satan" Magee as the duo Satan and Adam. After working the streets of Harlem from 1986 to 1991, Gussow and Magee duo toured internationally between 1991 and 1998. Their performing credits include the Chicago Blues Festival, the Newport Jazz Festival, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, The King Biscuit Blues Festival, the Kansas City Jazz & Blues Festival, the Philadelphia Folk Festival and RiverBlues Festival, and more, along with hundreds of club gigs. They released two albums on Flying Fish Records, including the W. C. Handy-nominated Harlem Blues (1991) and Mother Mojo (1993). Later releases include Living on the River (1996) and, on the Modern Blues Harmonica label, Word on the Street: Harlem Recordings, 1989 (2008).

    In his recent incarnation as a one-man band, Gussow takes a cue from Magee and does it all-singing, blowing amplified harp, and stomping out some thump-and-metal grooves. Gussow's new solo album, Kick and Stomp (2010), has spent many weeks at #1 in the "Hot New Releases in Acoustic Blues" chart at Amazon mp3's and has received heavy play on Bluesville (Sirius/XM).

    http://www.reverbnation.com/adamgussow

    #90121
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
    Member
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    #13 Molly Gene One Whoaman Band

    "For those who like their whiskey straight and their blues deep and dirty, Hillbilly Love by Molly Gene-One Whoaman Band is one not to be missed. I will warn those of you just edging your way into our little corner of purgatory that her first release, Hillbilly Love, may serve you well as training wheels, because onceHillbilly Love kicks in and this eleven track #10 train full of driving, moonshine-drenched and emotionally raw deep blues starts rolling down the rails, there’s no getting back off. I have been told by those who know Molly Gene and have shared a bill with her that “she’s a sweetheart, but when she gets on stage, the devil comes out” and nothing on this CD would make me believe otherwise. Molly Gene’s rasping gravelly vocals sway from urgently plaintive to intensely aggressive and set the tone from the outset." The Boston Blues Society – Lee Jergensen

    “Molly Gene, “The One Whoaman Band” is nothing at all like any one-person band you have ever seen or heard. She is not a novelty act; she is the real deal, and she plays genuine deep Blues. It’ll cut you to the bone. Her latest CD, “Hillbilly Love”, is one of the grittiest, gutsiest and aggressive Blues albums I have ever heard, and I had heard a lot.”

    The Coyote Bill Appreciation Society – KC BLUES NEWS

    http://mollygene.org/

    #90122
    cjohnson22463
    cjohnson22463
    Member
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    #14 james leg

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/James-Leg

    hell, just John himself would be a deep blues fest.

    he's also playing the bbq on memorial day.

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